Essential cinema back on the big screen. Beginning Sunday August 10 we’ll be showing Masterpieces of Polish Cinema through the good graces of Martin Scorsese and the Poles. The series will begin with ASHES and DIAMONDS.

Celebrate Italian Cinema with Prof. Joseph Luzzi

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Sept 28
Sunday 1:30 pm $35
(This event is a fund-raiser for our classic cinema series)
Please join us for this excursion into Italian classic cinema with Professor Luzzi who will explore some of the greatest works ever to appear on the Italian screen, showing clips from masterpieces by Federico Fellini, Michelangelo Antonioni, Roberto Rossellinim and others.
Tickets include a signed copy of Luzzi’s new memoir, My Two Italies,
plus a complimentary glass of wine and hors d’oeuvres at Rhinebeck’s Market St. Restaurant (around the corner) where the celebration and discussion continues with Prof. Luzzi. Don’t miss out – the event promises to be an enjoyable celebration of Italy’s remarkable cinematic traditions as well as great conversation and fun. 
Joseph Luzzi is a writer and professor of Italian at Bard College. The first child in his Calabrian family born in the U.S., his recently published memoir, My Two Italies (Farrar, Straus and Giroux) is the dramatic story of his Italian family’s immigration and an insider’s look at the turbulence of life in Italy today, especially during the Berlusconi years.
He is a frequent contributor of essays and reviews to publications including the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Bookforum, the London Times Literary Supplement, and many others. His first book, Romantic Europe and the Ghost of Italy (Yale Univ. Press 2008), received the Scaglione Prize for Italian Studies from the Modern Language Association, and he is the author of the forthcoming A Cinema of Poetry: Aesthetics of the Italian Art Film (Johns Hopkins Univ. Press, 2014). His work has been translated into Italian and Portuguese, and he has lectured throughout the world on art, film, literature, and Italian culture. He has received an essay award from the Dante Society of America, a teaching prize from Yale College, and a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities. We’ve enjoyed his previous film and discussion sessions here at Upstate Films Rhinebeck, and welcome him back. I love Luzzi.
 
Visit Prof Luzzi’s website
Read Reviews

Martin Scorsese presents Masterpieces of Polish Cinema

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Series ongoing in both Rhinebeck and Woodstock
(Poland/1950s into the 1980s)
“In 2011, I had the opportunity to visit the Polish National Film School in Łódź, Poland, at the invitation of the great director, Andrzej Wajda. It was a trip I had wanted to make for years as I had long been drawn to the school and to Polish cinema from the time I was a film student at NYU, studying under my teacher and mentor, Haig Manoogian. It was at NYU—a school modeled after the legendary film program at Łódź – that I learned not just how films are made, but why.The school nurtured in me an unshakable belief in artistic expression grounded in Italian Neorealism, the French New Wave, the surreptitious poetry of the old Hollywood masters, and Polish cinema: the great, sweeping, humanistic, intimate and profound movies that were an integral part of what, looking back, seems more and more like a golden age of international cinema.”

 There are many revelations in the “Masterpieces of Polish Cinema” series and whether you’re familiar with some of these films or not, it’s an incredible opportunity to discover for yourself the great power of Polish cinema, on the big screen in brilliantly restored digital masters. — Martin Scorsese

“… This is a cinema of personal vision, social commitment and poetic responsibility from which we’ve all learned and which sets a high standard that, as a filmmaker, I strive to achieve with every film, every time out. Each of the films in this special series embodies what Wajda called “the ‘impertinent freedom of creativity in the cinema” These are films that have great emotional and visual power—they’re “serious” films that, with their depth, stand up to repeated viewings. The subtext of great conflict and cultural identity is universal, even if you don’t know the history of Poland, the themes in these films will resonate, as they did profoundly for me. There are many revelations in the “Masterpieces of Polish Cinema” series and whether you’re familiar with some of these films or not, it’s an incredible opportunity to discover for yourself the great power of Polish cinema, on the big screen in brilliantly restored digital masters. I hope you will enjoy these great films as much I do.Thanks to The Film Foundation and Milestone Films in the United States, and Propaganda Foundation, DI Factory and KinoRP in Poland for making this magnificent series possible.”
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